Living History
LHVW Fundraiser 2017

Latest Followers:

Kghia Lady Hartfield Claire-Sophie de Rocoulle Lorsagne de Sade Gabrielle de Polastron Leopoldina Graf von und zu Helstein Bebe Begonia Tatiana Dokuchic

Foray Literary Society notes and plans

Merry Chase
@merry-chase
6 months ago
130 posts

[This post was originally only to let everyone know we had launched the Regency-era literary society, "Foray." But at our second meeting we decided this forum would be a great place to keep track of what we're doing and planning. ]

Today Foray had its first meeting and I can tell it's going to be a ton of fun. Join us. We have crumpets. You can catch up quickly on what went down at the first meeting, in the notes below this pretty graphic. (Ackermann I L U)

3622_discussions.png?width=750

Foray 2016 10 02 first meeting report

Ten people attended the first meeting of Foray, the Antiquity Aubrey & Austen Association, a Regency era literary society, held at 10:00 a.m. SLT on Sunday 02 October 2016. All came dressed in period attire, and there were moments of light roleplay, but mostly casual planning. Our Plans:

- To have a meeting at 10:00 a.m. SLT on the first Sunday of each month in our upstairs Reading Room at the Sanditon Shops, Port Austen, Regency Somereset, Antiquity Argyle. http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Antiquity%20Argyle/70/101/31

- To share recommendations and reviews of any literature written during, OR about, the Regency era.

- To choose one book per quarter as our Quarterly Read to read together and discuss at one of four special sessions per year, on the first Sundays in December, March, June and September.

- To sometimes include live readings in voice, of a short passage a couple of paragraphs from some book under discussion. All are welcome to bring readings and suggestions and to lead discussions!

- To share info about, and invitations to, Foray, with other people and groups who may be interested.

- To go as light or as in-depth as we like, reading only the Quarterly Read novel, or adding in supplementary readings, as we each individually choose.

We chose for our first Quarterly Read the popular favorite, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, which is free via Project Gutenberg, linked in a bookcase on your left as you enter our Reading Room, or here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1342

Those who wish to delve deeper may join in also reading Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft (mother of the Frankenstein author of the same name) which youll find linked from a book on the front counter in the Reading Room, or here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3420

Next to the volume with Vindication is another early feminist authors work, Olympe de Gouges Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen, written in 1791 in reaction to the French revolutionary constitution. http://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1791degouge1.asp

In addition I (Merry Chase) personally find some interesting parallels between Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, and Patrick OBrians Master and Commander, the first of his seafaring Aubrey and Maturin adventures, so as this is our first Quarterly Read of Foray, Im going to throw in Master and Commander by Patrick OBrian as an additional related work, and suggest that if nothing else, you read the opening where Maturin and Aubrey, future fast friends, nearly come to a duel over quiet at a concert. Im sorry that M&C is not available free, like P&P is, but you can pick up a copy used, quite cheap.

Our first Quarterly Read discussion will be led by me unless someone else steps forward and volunteers to lead it. That will be on the 4th of December.

Next Meeting: Sunday 6 November 2016 10amSLT, for general Regency literary discussion.


updated by @merry-chase: 06 Nov 2016 12:09:31PM
Tiamat Windstorm von Hirvi
@tiamat-windstorm-von-hirvi
6 months ago
278 posts

Delightful. I have read bothPride and Prejudice andMaster and Commanderrepeatedly, but not in tandem; doing so will be a pleasure!




--
Antiquity Hedgewitch
Tatiana Dokuchic
@tatiana-dokuchic
6 months ago
1,496 posts

Pride and Prejudice is one of those rare books that always seems to get better with every reading.  I might have to find some Regency wear and join the fun :)

As an aside; I see that the transfer of this post has effected the formatting a bit.  I believe that if you resize the picture it may fall into line.  Go into update and click the image for resize options or you can drag a corner to change the size.  After some experimentation, I've found that a width of 600 usually works well.  Also, with the new site we can set recurring events (woohoo) if you'd like to create one for this. 




--
Proprietress of Tatiana's Tea Room ~ Co-owner of the Duché de Coeur ~ Webmistress of this site
Merry Chase
@merry-chase
6 months ago
130 posts

Thank you Tiamat and Tatiana! 

Tatiana, suggestion taken -- yes, adjusting the photo size did clean up the formatting. And yes, sounds good -- I'll set this up as a recurring Event. W00t! 

Tia, here's to another re-read! 

Merry Chase
@merry-chase
5 months ago
130 posts

Our second meeting was held today, 6 November 2016. Attendance was lower than at our launch, but we suspected that might be due to the USA's time change. 

We added some titles to the list of reading ideas. We decided it would be good to have a forum-based location for that list, and decided this Living History VW forum would be an excellent choice. 

It was suggested that we could watch some Regency-era video, and listen to audiobooks, together. Kghia agreed to take the lead on organizing watching and listening parties, with assistance from Jacon who has had some experience with setting up these sorts of things in past.

All are encouraged to add suggestions, whether at meetings, or by comment to this topic! 

The list of planned reads, and possible future reads, follows. 

for discussion Sunday 4 December 2016:

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Additional optional titles for 4 December 2016

Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft

Olympe de Gouge’s Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen

Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian (or at least the opening scene)

Pride & Prejudice & Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith

Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James

 

Future Reading Ideas

Lady Susan by Jane Austen, written in 1794 but unpublished until 1871

Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott, 1820, set in 12th c.

Poldark Saga by Winston Graham published 1945-2002, set in 1783 - 1820

Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier published 1936, set in 1820

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke 2004 set in 1806

The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers 1983 time-travel to 1801

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving 1820

Zorro by Isabel Allende 2005 sent in California 1790 – 1815 + epilogue 1840

Tales of the Napoleonic Era, by Honore de Balzac

Titles by Jeffery Farnol

Titles by Zen Cho

"A Jane Austen Education: How Six Novels Taught Me About Love, Friendship, and the Things That Really Matter" by William Deresiewicz.

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Emma Orczy, written in 1905 and set in 1792

On Stranger Tides, by Tim Powers, 1987, set in 1718

Longbourn by Jo Baker, 2013, retelling Pride & Prejudice from the servants’ point of view

Wild Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, 1936, set in 1834 or so

Mr Midshipman Hornblower by C.S. Forester, 1950, set in 1794 (& other Hornblower series novels)


At our next meeting we will discuss Pride and Prejudice and related works as listed above, choose our book to discuss in our March 2017 meeting, move forward with other plans already initiated, and welcome additional ideas. 

Tatiana Dokuchic
@tatiana-dokuchic
5 months ago
1,496 posts

Very cool!

Besides Pride & Prejudice I've read:

  • Pride & Prejudice & Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith
  • Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James
  • Longbourn by Jo Baker, 2013, retelling Pride & Prejudice from the servants’ point of view

Might have to go on a binge re-reading and join you in December :)




--
Proprietress of Tatiana's Tea Room ~ Co-owner of the Duché de Coeur ~ Webmistress of this site
Merry Chase
@merry-chase
5 months ago
130 posts

Yes, please join us! I want to hear about Longbourn. I'm very eager to get my hands on a copy of that one. 

Merry Chase
@merry-chase
4 months ago
130 posts

I read Longbourne in a day. Now I'm listening to Longbourne. I love Longbourne! What an excellent job Jo Baker did of entering the world of the workers in another era. The wonderfully sweeping story arc, and the perfectly placed details along the way, make this an excellent read, whatever the subject matter. And to me, the stories of poor and working-class people are always more interesting and accessible than court intrigues.  

Tatiana Dokuchic
@tatiana-dokuchic
4 months ago
1,496 posts

I'm glad that you enjoyed it!  It gives so much more depth to Austen's world.  While I was commiserating with the Bennet girls & their quest for economic security it was too easy to forget that their servants were in even more dire straights.  I'll never think of Elizabeth getting all muddy while walking over to see Jane without knowing the price Sarah would pay in labour to get those clothes clean again.

On a related note, I had been meaning to write a small blog post about Jane Austen for years now.  Finally got it done so that I could also promote "The Foray".  Hope it sparks some additional interest :)




--
Proprietress of Tatiana's Tea Room ~ Co-owner of the Duché de Coeur ~ Webmistress of this site
Merry Chase
@merry-chase
4 months ago
130 posts

A link to your blog post on Austen, please!

Tatiana Dokuchic
@tatiana-dokuchic
4 months ago
1,496 posts
Merry Chase:

A link to your blog post on Austen, please!

Chasing Jane: Pursuing Jane Austen is Always a Pleasure




--
Proprietress of Tatiana's Tea Room ~ Co-owner of the Duché de Coeur ~ Webmistress of this site
Merry Chase
@merry-chase
4 months ago
130 posts

Today, we had our third meeting. And it was our first big Quarterly Meeting! The turnout was a little lower than at our first two meetings, perhaps because of holidays, but we did have one or two new members join us, and many returning members, and the conversation was lively.

So many excellent questions and observations! To me, the hour-or-so went by very quickly.  We talked about the relationships between characters in Pride and Prejudice. For example, the dynamic between the sisters, or the marriage of Mr and Mrs Bennet and the prospects for happiness in the Darcys' marriage. We talked about plot twists like the catalyst of Lydia's elopement and that of Lady Catherine's censure. We touched on Austen's view of women's place in society, and speculated as to whether she might have been familiar with some early feminist authors. And we touched on some tantalizing spinoffs, from Pride and Prejudice, written more recently. 


So, for our next big Quarterly Meeting, we plan to pursue further, the topic of spinoffs. So...

For Discussion Next:  


Longbourn by Jo Baker, 2013. A look at Pride and Prejudice's world from the point of view of "downstairs." The servants to the Bennet, Bingley. and Darcy families are seen to have lives -- and story lines! -- of their own, as authentic and perhaps even more moving than those of their employers. While providing us with these new characters, Baker also sheds new light on the motivations of Austen's beloved ensemble. 



Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith, 2009. In this parody, the familiar story unfolds with a twist. Zombies are terrorizing dear England, and accomplished young ladies like Miss Elizabeth Bennet must wield their swords to combat the foe.  Blood, guts, mayhem, and much merriment ensue! 


Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James, 2011. Back in a more traditional setting (no zombies) we return to the cast of Pride and Prejudice and to their familiar haunts, but James takes us beyond the years covered by Austen, plus unveils a dastardly murder mystery. Enjoy the whodunnit while taking in fascinating details of how life unfolded for Austen's cast of characters after the happily-ever-after of the original book. 


Upcoming meetings:

 
Sunday 1 January -- enjoy a New Year's gathering for casual discussion of books and the Regency era! Catch up a little on our reading... did you read or revisit Pride and Prejudice recently? Started reading the spinoffs? 

Sunday 5 February -- discuss Regency era life and literature in general, and Pride and Prejudice in particular.  Knowing the original will help us appreciate the spinoffs.

In February's meeting we launch a fun game: Regency Personals! It's a writing game. Write a short blurb of a few lines, in the style you think one of our favorite Regency characters might use in a dating profile. How would Elizabeth Bennet or Mr Darcy describe themselves on OK Cupid? What would Captain Jack Aubrey or Diana Villiers put themselves out there on Tinder? Or maybe you'll come up with a Chance Encounters listing? Bring your short writings in to share at the 5 February meeting of Foray...in time for St. Valentine's Day!


Sunday 5 March -- our big Quarterly Meeting, when we'll discuss the three spinoffs listed above, plus we'll decide what to read together next. Don't miss it! 


All are welcome to lounge in our reading room and borrow from its shelves. That's also where we hold our meetings. You'll find it here -> http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Antiquity%20Argyle/69/95/31


Please freely share our meeting plans with friends and groups. All are welcome! Attire, casual. Regency attire welcome but OOC is fine, so long as you're decent. 


updated by @merry-chase: 17 Jan 2017 11:20:16AM
Merry Chase
@merry-chase
2 months ago
130 posts

Since last time I've migrated computers so I can't add a very detailed account of the January 1 meeting. It was a very small meeting, and we talked about characters in depth, and made some comparisons between plots in Pride and Prejudice vs Master and Commander

The big news is, we came up with a great new game! 

Next meeting we launch it: Regency Personals! It's a writing game. Write a short blurb of a few lines, in the style you think one of our favorite Regency characters might use in a dating profile. How would Elizabeth Bennet or Mr Darcy describe themselves on OK Cupid? How would Captain Jack Aubrey or Diana Villiers put themselves out there on Tinder? Or maybe you'll come up with a Chance Encounters listing? Bring your short writings in to share at the 5 February meeting of Foray...in time for St. Valentine's Day!

Merry Chase
@merry-chase
2 months ago
130 posts

Today's meeting, the 5th monthly meeting of Foray, featured a game of Regency Romance Personals. You can read all about it, and play it yourself, here. 

Also, we talked a little about the characters and books we drew on for the game. 

At our March 5 meeting we'll talk about three spinoffs from Pride & Prejudice...

For Discussion Next:  


Longbourn by Jo Baker, 2013. A look at Pride and Prejudice's world from the point of view of "downstairs." The servants to the Bennet, Bingley. and Darcy families are seen to have lives -- and story lines! -- of their own, as authentic and perhaps even more moving than those of their employers. While providing us with these new characters, Baker also sheds new light on the motivations of Austen's beloved ensemble. 



Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith, 2009. In this parody, the familiar story unfolds with a twist. Zombies are terrorizing dear England, and accomplished young ladies like Miss Elizabeth Bennet must wield their swords to combat the foe.  Blood, guts, mayhem, and much merriment ensue! 


Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James, 2011. Back in a more traditional setting (no zombies) we return to the cast of Pride and Prejudice and to their familiar haunts, but James takes us beyond the years covered by Austen, plus unveils a dastardly murder mystery. Enjoy the whodunnit while taking in fascinating details of how life unfolded for Austen's cast of characters after the happily-ever-after of the original book. 

I hope to see you at our reading room in Port Austen, Antiquity. We'll meet at 10am on Sunday 5 March.